God’s Word

/Tag:God's Word
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April 2019

“A Brief History of Time: 5. Tomorrow: New Life”/Ezekiel 37: 1-14; John 11:11-15, 17-20, 23-26, 34-45; Romans 8:6-11 (NJB)/Rev. Rodger Allen/4-14-19 

By |April 18th, 2019|Sermons|

Today’s sermon concludes our series called  “A Brief History of Time.” The title of the series, as explained before, was borrowed from Stephen Hawking’s book by that name, but while he looked at the physical history of the universe, things like big bang theories and expanding galaxies, we’ve looked at what can be called “salvation history” – a history of God’s relationship with humanity. For three weeks we looked at the Past: the creation of humanity at the beginning; humanity’s insistence on sinning, which became obvious very shortly after the beginning; and God’s act in the life and death of Jesus Christ to reconcile God and people, to bring us together, in spite of that sin. Last week’s topic was labelled “Today,” or the Present: How do we respond to God’s love? And today’s topic is labelled, very loosely, the Future, or “Tomorrow”: what will be the outcome of a relationship with God? […]

“A Brief History of Time: Apples & Satan & Sex?”/Gen. 3: 1-19, 23; Rom. 1: 18-25, 28/Rev. Rodger Allen/3-24-19

By |April 2nd, 2019|Sermons|

The title of the sermon series –  “A Brief History of Time” – is borrowed from a best-selling book by theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking, in about 1990.  For many years that book was what he was most famous for; in the last few it may have been that he was Sheldon Cooper’s hero, and appeared on a couple episodes of “Big Bang Theory.” The book is about the origins of our solar system and the physics of how the universe works. Now, I took science and math courses in high school and college. I think I understand the book up to about page 30. […]

December 2018

“Whom Do You Magnify?” 12/16/18/3rd Sunday of Advent/Scripture: Ps. 99:1-5; Lk. 1:46-55/by Rev. Laurie Williams

By |December 17th, 2018|Advent-Christmas, Sermons|

          Mary’s Song, also known as The Magnificat, could probably stand alone, it is so powerful.  The Magnificat magnifies the Lord in abundant thanksgiving.  Important meaning to lives of faith is embedded throughout.  We, who all have enough to live on adequately or well beyond, may get a little nervous over this song’s focus on the poor and downtrodden.  Mary sang this song after she went to visit her relative, Elizabeth, after the angel Gabriel came to her giving her the news that she would be impregnated with a son who would become the Messiah.  Elizabeth recognized that Mary’s baby would be a very special baby.  She became quite emotional as she cries out to Mary, “Blessed are you among women, and blessed is the fruit of your womb.  And why has this happened to me, that the mother of my Lord comes to me?  For as soon as I heard the sound of your greeting, the child in my womb leaped for joy.  And blessed is she who believed that there would be a fulfillment of what was spoken to her by the Lord.” […]

“What is Our Job at Advent?”/Rev. Rodger Allen Luke 3: 2-3, 7-17; Zeph. 3:14-20/12.9.18

By |December 11th, 2018|Advent-Christmas, Sermons|

            Today we begin by taking a look at two famous figures of the Christmas season, two people we hear about every year at this time. The first . . . is Santa Claus – yes, in a church service! Santa Claus is a happy man, “jolly Old Saint Nicholas,” who dresses in a bright cheery colorful suit, all red and white. Santa doesn’t turn away from a fine meal or favorite goodies, apparently; he’s also been described as “plump,” and many people have to use a carefully-placed pillow or two to dress up like him. In fact, he sort of represents the good foods we all indulge in at Christmas time – the candy canes and Christmas cookies and egg nog and, according to one song, “figgy pudding,” whatever that is. At this time of year, we share in Santa’s fondness for goodies. […]

“A Steady Light Shining in the Dark”/12/2/18/Scripture: John 1:1-10; Luke 2:25-32/by Rev. Laurie Williams

By |December 5th, 2018|Sermons|

          I can’t tell you how many people I hear every week talk about how awful and dark the world is now.  Focusing on that too much is not good for one’s mental health.  The world has always been a dark place.  Nature can be cruel.  Accidents happen.  Loved ones become ill.  Human beings sin.  That is our reality with the cycle of life and death.  Still, hope is so important to hold onto as a Christian people, as is bringing that hope to as many others as we can.  Yet, the fact of the matter is that we do hear much bad news, sometimes daily.  We may feel bombarded by it.  With technology the way it is, at times we know of something minutes after it happens anywhere in the world.  We definitely can feel weighed down by it all. […]