Bible

/Tag:Bible
­

July 2018

“Bringing All We Are to The Table”/Rev. Rodger Allen/Psalm 100; Psalm 88: 1-5, 8-9, 14/7.29.18

By |July 31st, 2018|Sermons|

When we invite someone we don’t know very well over to our homes for dinner for the first time, we expect that their behavior will be fairly formal or proper, don’t we? Imagine having your child’s fiancé’s parents over, for example, as the first time you ever meet. If they had been quarreling in the car on the way over, we wouldn’t expect them to continue the argument in front of us relative strangers over dinner. If they were worried about something we wouldn’t expect them to cry in front of us. If they felt high-spirited and mischievous, we wouldn’t expect them to start playfully tossing dinner rolls at each other – not with new acquaintances, not at a first meeting. There’s a certain standard of restrained, proper behavior. […]

“Women of the Old Testament: Eve, the Easer of Loneliness”/7/22/18/Scripture: Genesis 1-2:2 selected verses/by Rev. Laurie Williams

By |July 23rd, 2018|Sermons|

          Like Rodger, I too am doing a series.  For many of the weeks of the next few months, when I preach, I will talk about a different Old Testament woman based on the book by Lynn Japinga entitled “Preaching the Women of the Old Testament”. The following true story was in the newspaper, The Irish Times, from July 21, 2018.  The author of the story explains:  “I’m a 44-year-old professional woman, very happily married with two lovely children. Lucky, eh?  (Still) I never thought I would feel the kind of loneliness that makes my heart ache.  But I do.  I’m originally from Ireland.  I moved to Wales twenty years ago for work, met my husband (who is also Irish) and settled into life there. I had a large group of female friends acquired through baby play groups, school and work.  […]

“Grace Is Not In Vain”/7/15/18/Scripture: 2 Cor. 5:11-6:2; Isaiah 11:1-2, 6-10/by Rev. Laurie Williams

By |July 18th, 2018|Sermons|

           A lawyer, newly relocated to a village, went duck hunting on his property.  He shot a duck and it fell not on his property but on his farmer neighbor’s property, specifically in his garden.  The lawyer started to climb the fence between their two properties and the farmer came over to his garden and picked up the dead duck saying, “No, no, the duck is no longer yours because it fell onto my property.”  The lawyer incredulously stated, “Do you know who I am?  I’m a lawyer and I’ll sue you.”  To which the farmer calmly replied, “You are new to this village and we settle disputes with the three-kick rule.  The one who has the complaint gets on the ground and is kicked first and if that one can then stand, he kicks the other and that goes on until one can’t stand.  In this case, if it is you standing, you will get this duck back.”  So the lawyer lies down on the ground and the farmer gives him three quick kicks in the leg, side, and shoulder. The lawyer then stands up and exclaims, “ok, now it is your turn.”  And the farmer states, “That’s ok, you can have the duck!”  […]

“Ephesians Chapter One: Who You Are”/Rev. Rodger Allen/Eph. 1:1-6; Eph. 1:7-16/7.8.18

By |July 16th, 2018|Sermons|

        I don’t know if this custom was ever practiced in this church, or if so, how long ago it was, but it used to be the practice, in many Presbyterian churches, of deciding what the topics for sermons would be in this way: The minister would select a book of the Bible, like Exodus or Acts or Hebrews, and in a series of sermons, week by week, preach straight through that book, chapter 1 to the end, as many Sundays as it took. They didn’t choose their topics by looking at a particular issue or development in the world or in the church, and addressing that. Or by following, more or less, a Lectionary or other schedule of Bible readings that allow the congregation to sample most sections of the Bible over the course of a couple years. Their series weren’t interrupted by special days or seasons like Pentecost, Advent, or Community Honeybee services, because they didn’t observe those days and seasons back then. Nope, straight through one book. I’ve heard accounts of 30 consecutive sermons on Romans, or Revelation, as they were analyzed paragraph by paragraph, sentence by sentence, word by word. […]

“Why Are We Here?” Rev. Rodger Allen 7-1-18 Mark 6: 1-2, Psalm 100

By |July 5th, 2018|Sermons|

  It’s important for you to know, as we begin today, that much of the material in today’s sermon comes from a sermon written by the Rev. William Willimon, and printed in the magazine “Pulpit Resources.” I tell you that first because I feel strongly that preachers should always give proper credit when they use the words or ideas of someone else, so I always tell you if I’m doing that. But it’s especially important to understand that today because there are parts of the message today that people could conclude I wrote to refer to a particular issue or group of people at Paris Presbyterian Church; that I was trying to influence our direction somehow. This introduction lets you know I didn’t do that; this is not directed at anyone or anything in particular, here. As far as I know, Rev. Willimon’s never even been to Paris Presbyterian Church, so he couldn’t possibly have been writing about us. No, his remarks reflect a situation found in many, many churches, of many different denominations, all over the country. This isn’t personal.  […]